About your Search

20121027
20121104
Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)
the storm even hit so they were able to get here relatively quick. the national guard was here. fema was here. they were all working with the local authorities and were able to do it pretty smoothly. they've stopped search and rescue efforts for tonight and say they've gotten all of the elderly and handicapped people out of the area. they will do it if there are emergency situations. they're not entirely sure how many are left in the houses. we did speak with some who said they were going to stay regardless, they didn't feel like it was much of a threat. the high tide, though comes in at midnight tonight and they are concerned about getting another four feet of water. right now it's receding a lot since we've been here for the past few hours the entire day mostly. we can show you what it looks like here and this is certainly what it looks like. you can hear the sounds of the activity here and the generators and sirens every once in a while but wove a hard time conveying is what it smells like. there's a lot of gasoline, a lot of sewage. you don't want to imagine, rachel. what's in al
jersey before the storm even hit. they were able to get here quick. national guard was here, fema was here. they were all working with local authorities and able to do it smoothly. they stopped search and rescue efforts for tonight. they have gotten all of the elderly and handicap out of the area. they will do it if there are emergency situations. they are not sure how many people are left in the the houses. we spoke to some people who said they were going to stay regardless. they didn't feel like it was much of a threat. the high tide though comes in at midnight tonight and they are concerned about getting another four feet of water. it's receded a lot. we can show you what it looks like here. you can hear the sounds of the activity here and the generators and the sirens every once in awhile. we have a hard time conveying what it smells like. there's a lot of gasoline, a lot of sewage. you don't want to imagine what's in all this water right now. >> everybody needs to take that high tide seriously as we know that's one of the things leaders are saying is to think this is necessar
of the things that i did today was talk to fema about trying to get an office and staff person in various parts of the district today, and they're working on it, and with the money that comes to downs for recovery to rebuild board walks or municipal buildings, i think there is a 25% state and local match. so we ask that that be waived. many of the towns are small and can't afford that. so there's a lot of cooperation going on. >> when you're making those calls, someone is answering your call and you're getting responses -- >> i literally called the fema while i walked into the nbc building today and they called me back in ten minutes. >> i know you were personally evacuated, i know you're back without power, good luck to you, stay in touch. >> thank you. >> for reference, this is the sixth district in new jersey, do we have that map? there we go, it's marked in red there where, of course, we have seen some of the worst devastation from this crisis. last night live we had a shocking moment in a live conversation with a very hard hit town, this is what happened, this is don zimmer. >> probably ha
, emergency supplies, and we have over 2,000 fema personnel that are on the ground right now. their job, now that we're moving out of the search and rescue phase, is to make sure that they are going out and talking to individual communities, so that people know exactly how they can get the help that they need. >> new jersey congressman frank palone was with governor christie today. he is with us now, he represents new jersey's sixth congressional district, which is a shoreline district, fronting both new york harbor and the atlantic ocean. sir, thanks very much for your time. i know you've been all over your district in the past couple of days. what kind of damage are you seeing along the coast and in the cities of your district? >> it's all kinds of damage. i mentioned union beach to you before. that's a place where maybe three or four blocks from the bay, from the rarington bay, the storm surge came in and the waves were pounding on top of the houses. so some house just washed away completely. others were pounded to rubble. i had never seen anything like that before. there are other places
, chuck todd reports tonight that the fema director craig foou gait has told states if they incur extra costs because of the storm, if they have to move polling places or bring in generators for power, should sandy cause elections officials any expensive changes, states and cities will be reimbursed for those costs by the federal disaster relief, ev if one doesn't believe in that sort of thing. this is not a time for ideology. let's bring in michelle franzen in battery park in lower manhattan. everybody has been keeping an eye on the storm surge and wondering how high the water is going to rise. and what threat it's going to impose. what can you tell us about the conditions and how they are changing now? >> reporter: they have certainly deteriorat deteriorat deteriorated. we have a photo to show you. there's some water that's been reported gushing into the brooklyn battery tunnel. that's not a good sign of all this water pouring into lower manhattan. we have a picture of that to show you. obviously, it's a dangerous situation for emergency workers too. trying to assess the damage or wha
that he felt that the fema officials were in place at the areas where they felt they would need the most help. how confident are you that new york, that brooklyn, that throughout this region there will be enough resources to do what needs to get done? >> well, i know that there's been a lot of focus on new york city as an area that was going to get the brunt and a large portion of the storm. i know that our governor and our mayor have the talks with the president of the united states and he has made it clear that he would do everything that he could possibly do to make sure that we received the type of support we feed to get the city moving once again. the city of new york is not only home to us, but it is also the economic engine of our nation, so i don't think that we'll be overlooked as a resource is put out to get the city moving once again. >> congresswoman yvette clarke on this early tuesday morning, thanks for being with us. >> my pleasure. >>> now to delaware where officials say the flood damage from sandy could be equal to or greater than damage from some of the worst tropical s
on in new york. fema, his response agency, has been fantastic. the whole cabinet has really been deployed. so i think he's done this very well. i worked in the clinton administration. i was the hud secretary. hud is one of response agencies. i know what the federal government traditionally does. they're doing an outstanding job in my opinion. >> what's the top of the priority state for this state in terms of recovery and repair? >> we have two different types of situation if you will. the situation you're talking about is basically in manhattan. then you have it out of manhattan within the downstate metropolitan area situation. in manhattan, manhattan, as you know, has that elaborate infrastructure below ground. and new york does not historically have floods or hurricanes. it's not what we get in this part of the country. so we designed this elaborate infrastructure without really anticipating that you may have water coming over the banks and we've now flooded the whole tunnel system, road tunnels, subway tunnels, and we have under the, beneath the ground in manhattan, 10, 15, 20 stories
or to assess, we'll see what the needs are and work closely with the federal, fema, to see what the needs are at the local level. >> adam grossman of the new jersey office of emergency management. it's going to be a long night for you and i know a lot of long days and nights ahead. thanks so much for taking the time to talk to us. a couple of other things we haven't talked about in the last hour or so, one is if you're trying to get anywhere in the air. there have been 12,000 flights canceled so far. and there's been a tremendous ripple effect. not just flights on the eastern seaboard, but flights coming from europe, flights coming in from elsewhere, connecting flights. it's going to be a mess that has a domino effect and going to continue to have a domino effect. so if you have any plans for travel and that includes amtrak, buses, as well as any airline flights, it's going to be a mess for a while and you should check before heading to any of those places. we're going to take a quick break. 43 minutes past the hour. continuing coverage here on msnbc. ♪ atmix of energies.ve the world ne
Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)